6 Most Visited Places in New Orleans?

By | October 13, 2021

New Orleans has a distinct vibe. Much of the action centers on the French Quarter, with the renowned Bourbon Street at its heart when it comes to visitor attractions. As a result, New Orleans is the most well-known and distinctive city in the United States. Along the Mississippi River, which borders the French Quarter to the south, horse-drawn carriages are waiting to take visitors on tour, the Steamboat Natchez docked, and tourists are queuing to buy beignets.

Mardi Gras

Mardi Gras is New Orleans’ flagship festival, with celebrations lasting two weeks and culminating on Shrove Tuesday, the day before Ash Wednesday. Celebrations include virtually daily parades and various forms of entertainment and celebrations that intensify as the event nears its conclusion. Onlookers swarm the balconies and walkways to witness the parades and catch the strings of beaded necklaces thrown from the extravagantly adorned floats. Bourbon Street is one of the most popular gathering places, although the entire French Quarter is always crowded. You can also get profitable offers on Spirit Airlines flight Booking.

Jackson Plaza

Jackson Plaza, formerly known as Place d’Armes, is the central square in the center of the French Quarter. The area in front of the cathedral, along the iron fence surrounding the plaza, has long been a hangout for artists, and there are stores and restaurants nearby, making it a popular tourist destination. The St. Louis Cathedral, with its white façade and cone-shaped towers, dominates one end of the plaza. The Presbytere and Cabildo, both Louisiana State Museums, are also nearby the cathedral. It would be highly recommended to book your spirit Airlines flight tickets in advance in peak season.

National WWII Museum

Beyond All Boundaries, a film created and narrated by Tom Hanks, is played in the 4D Theater, with seats that rumble when tanks pass by on the screen and stage props that make the film into a full-fledged sensory experience. This museum is organized into three sections, one devoted to the Pacific War and the other to the European War. Short black-and-white documentary-style film clips provide a real-life look at how the artifacts on show were involved in the battle as you travel from room to room through the displays. Oral histories enhance the effect.

The French Quarter

The major attraction here is the architecture, set around a bend in the Mississippi River, but it is also a fantastic place for dining and entertainment. The French Quarter in New Orleans is where the majority of visitors go when they visit the city. Many of these structures now house hotels, restaurants, souvenir stores, galleries, and a plethora of jazz venues with various levels of quality entertainment.

The St. Louis Cathedral

The St. Louis Cathedral is a New Orleans landmark. In 1987, Pope John Paul II paid a visit to the cathedral. It was erected in 1794 on two previous churches and is recognized as the United States’ oldest continuously operating cathedral. Don Andres Almonester de Roxas, a Frenchman who spent money from his riches to restore New Orleans after the second great fire, contributed to the chapel’s construction.

The Garden District

The Garden District is an affluent residential neighborhood with magnificent mansions, and the best part is it is walkable. It is perhaps the conventional picture of the Deep South that many outsiders have. Some well-known celebrities have houses in this neighborhood. The majority of people come to appreciate the quiet setting and to see the houses, but there are also boutiques and coffee shops in the neighborhood. Still, they are spaced out and finding a lunch location may be more complex than imagined.

So visit the Spirit airlines reservations portal and book your tickets.